Making Spiders Webs Outside

7 July 2012 · 3 comments

in Science Outdoors

One class has been really enjoying their minibeast work this term. Recently, the children went on a hunt for spider’s webs. This is a good foggy or rainy day activity as the droplets catch on the webs and glisten beautifully.

The natural progression from here was for children to try and make their own webs. This was a lot more successful than I’d anticipated. I had set up a child-sized web in the shelter. This cause great excitement. I had left half the rope free to that the children could add to the web, as they wished.

I provided a variety of ropes. The children had to decide where would be a good place to build their webs. Clearly, yesterdays hunt was successful in that most children opted for bushes and branches…

I was surprised by the amount of time spent on task. One child work on the web below for at least twenty minutes…

The tree became the web that caught people! Quite a few children and adults found themselves tied up here…

I also provided ribbons as an alternative to rope. These were also seized with excitement and put to good use…

Whilst not all ribbon was necessarily web-like, the overall effect was fetching…

And I loved the tangled web of rope which took two older boys quite a while to sort out…

Back at the classroom, the children wove wool onto paper templates. These may be used for further weaving activities. Or perhaps the paper plate spiders will each have a web to call their home…

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{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

cecilia July 9, 2012 at 07:42

I loved your web ideas. More creative than mine I think.
I took a rather different approach, making a game.
Using bungee cord between large beech trees and carefully tied at intervals we set up one huge web for children aged 3 – 8 years. The children then tied themselves onto this web to be spiders with ordinary rope and other children were flies who had to try and negotiate the web without being “eaten” by the spider.

You have to be very careful the bungee cord is fixed so it does not “ping”.
Cecilia

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amy butler July 15, 2012 at 01:52

For summer camps here in Vermont we theme our afternoons to set the tone for singing, story, and creative play. After telling the native tale of how grandmother spider stole the sun children immersed themselves in building elaborate webs in the forest. Preschoolers, imagination, and string. That is fun!!

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